Hans Andersson - Intercollegiate Studies Institute: Think. Live Free.

Hans Andersson

YALE UNIVERSITY, Class of 2014

Things to know about Hans

Law student, software engineer, entrepreneur, novelist: Hans Andersson just about does it all. A summa cum laude graduate of Yale, Hans is simultaneously pursuing a law degree at Stanford and a master of liberal arts in software engineering at Harvard. As president of the ISI student group at Stanford, this multitalented young man has emerged as a leader on campus and a passionate voice for the principles of liberty.

ISI recently spoke with Hans about conservatism, economics, law, philosophy, and more.

“The more I looked into ISI, its values and activities, the more I took interest. I appreciate ISI’s commitment to nurturing the next generation of conservative thinkers.”

How did you find out about ISI?

I learned about ISI from a family friend who recommended the organization to me. The more I looked into ISI, its values and activities, the more I took interest. I appreciate ISI’s commitment to nurturing the next generation of conservative thinkers.

What was the highlight of your undergraduate experience?

One highlight of my undergraduate experience was a first-year program comprising six seminars in Western classics of literature, history, philosophy, and political thought.

What have you valued most about ISI?

I’ve most valued ISI’s support in bringing conservative speakers to address timely issues on campus and in organizing a student group for reading and discussing classic works of conservative thought.

How have you spent your summers while in college?

I got to enjoy five college summers because I took a one-year leave to study political science in Paris. My five summers I spent interning in finance and for a U.S. senator, attending an intensive immersion program for Chinese language in Beijing, taking courses in creative writing to start a novel manuscript, studying first-order logic and financial accounting, and cofounding an Internet start-up in social media.

Whom do you admire most, and why?

A friend of mine in college had an exceptionally mature perspective—which I fully appreciate only now—about what has always been most important and what just isn’t. He always made time to read, think, connect, discuss, and write. I’ve realized how remarkable that commitment is amid the pressures of life.

What advice would you give to other students who want to preserve the principles of liberty?

Read books that have always been worthwhile. Think about why they endure. Connect not only with people who think like you but also others who don’t. Discuss what you’re reading and thinking. Write about it. ISI can really help in several of these pursuits—check out everything ISI offers!